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The birth dearth

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Published by Pharos Books, Distributed by Ballantine Books in New York, NY .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • United States.,
  • Europe.

Subjects:

  • Fertility, Human -- United States.,
  • Fertility, Human -- Europe.,
  • Population forecasting -- United States.,
  • Population forecasting -- Europe.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes index.

StatementBen J. Wattenberg.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHB915 .W29 1987
The Physical Object
Paginationviii, 182 p. :
Number of Pages182
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3191669M
ISBN 100886873045, 0345343999
LC Control Number83063759

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The Birth Dearth Top results of your surfing The Birth Dearth Start Download Portable Document Format (PDF) and E-books (Electronic Books) Free Online Rating News / is books that can provide inspiration, insight, knowledge to the reader.   Some of what he discusses throughout the book is frightening other than the fact that I know I won't be living during some of the later years of the 'Birth Dearth.' I really enjoyed reading this book recommended to me by Mr. Ronald M. Joe and strongly suggest everyone where I work read it for their own understanding of population growth and /5(8).   Access-restricted-item true Addeddate Bookplateleaf Boxid IA Boxid_2 CH City New York Donor bwb External-identifierPages:   Jonathan Last’s new book attributes population decline and the birth dearth to two trends that started in the Enlightenment era—first, an effort to limit death; second, an effort to control birth. Both trends are guided by a desire to control nature.

Conversely, his new book aims at warning the public about the so-called danger o. The Birth Dearth Ben J. Wattenberg, Author Pharos Books $ (p) ISBN At the cusp of the postwar baby boom, demographers predicted a sharp fall in fertility and a global birth dearth. Yet even if this generation of seers turns out to be right, as seems likely, not. In his new book, “The Birth Dearth,” syndicated columnist Ben J. Wattenberg issues warnings that are barely distinguishable from those of Roosevelt and London.   This is a full recording of the webinar presented by on Ma 'Danger Ahead: The Birth Dearth and why occupancy rates will soon fall.' This presentation argued that census.

this “birth dearth” in many countries could cripple future generations. As the baby boomers approach retirement age and the pool of young workers shrinks, anxious governments wonder if costly social programs such as medicare and social security will survive in the coming Size: KB.   A second factor in Wisconsin’s “birth dearth” appears to be a delay in childbirth. Since , birth rates among women 20 to 24 years old have declined precipitously, while rates for women in their 30s have climbed. During , the median age of a mother having her first-born child increased almost two years, from to   But the birth- dearth promises social and economic problems in additional ways including a problem of declining economic growth over-all. So far as we know economic expansions have historically been connected with expanding populations. We know no precedent for declining populations being accompanied by new economic growth.5/5(2).   Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. The birth dearth by Ben J. Wattenberg, , Pharos Books, Distributed by Ballantine Books edition, in EnglishCited by: